SERVE ON rescuers went straight to work on arrival in Kathmandu yesterday, tasked by the UN co-ordination team to search some large structures in the city, including hotels and hospitals. The team of 8 have taken very portable equipment and are self-sufficient, making them ideally set up to travel further into the remote rural areas where little aid has yet arrived. They have now been tasked to do this and are travelling to an area where little is known about the extent of the damage as no rescuers have yet arrived.
 
As well as searching collapsed buildings for signs of life, and extracting those who are alive but unable to be reached without the teams specialist kit, they will also be passing valuable information to other agencies about the type of aid that is most needed in the area. The team can provide up to 8,000 litres a day of fresh filtered water – enough to support other rescue teams, or the affected community.
 
SERVE ON were the first British rescue team to arrive in Kathmandu after a devastating earthquake struck the Federal Republic of Nepal on Saturday. The team of volunteers have left a range of day jobs and neither they, nor the team behind the scenes will be paid for their dangerous work. 
 
“This rescue mission is not funded by the UK government, and the team doesn’t benefit from the DEC appeals: every penny comes from direct public donations, and more of them are needed”
 
 

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